Drug and Alcohol Use in College-Age Adults in 2019

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Past month NICOTINE VAPING rose dramatically over 3 years.

Among college students, rates of nicotine vaping reported in the past 30 days have increased from 6% in 2017 to 16% in 2018 and 22% in 2019. Rates among non-college peers have increased from 8% in 2017 to 13% in 2018 and 18% in 2019.

Past month CANNABIS VAPING increased sharply among non-college young adults in 2019.

Among college students, rates of cannabis vaping reported in the past 30 days have increased from 5% in 2017 to 11% in 2018 and 14% in 2019. Rates among non-college peers remained steady at 8% in 2017 and 2018 and increased to 17% in 2019.

Past year CANNABIS USE remained at historic highs.

Rates of any cannabis use reported over the past year have steadily increased from 37% in 2014 to 43% in 2019 in non-college young adults. Rates among college students have increased from 34% in 2014 to 43% in 2019, accounting for a 9% five-year increase.

Daily CANNABIS USE was more common among non-college young adults in 2019

Daily use of cannabis—defined as use on 20 or more occasions in the past 30 days—was nearly 3x as high among young adults not attending college compared to peers in college. In 2019, 6% of college students and 15% of non-college peers used cannabis daily.

Note: Figures have been rounded to the nearest whole number.

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